Atheism is a Hate Group.  This is certainly an incendiary statement, and I do not mean to say that anyone who is non-theistic has committed an act of hate merely for choosing to live their life without a personal belief in religion. However, I will stand by that statement regardless. You see, Atheism has become something larger than a mere dictionary definition. It has become a banner under which a movement has formed, and it is to that movement which I am referring.

 

There is a concerted campaign by an organized group of people to eradicate religion from our society, destroy religious institutions, and marginalize those who subscribe to religion. They seek to block the free practice of religion, dictate what adherents may believe, and stymie the free speech of religious people when they attempt to share what they believe. This is not a case of likeminded individuals standing together for self-determination. This is a case of people banding together for the purpose of harassing and violating the rights of others. In short, the Atheist movement has become a hate group.

 

In November of 2016 the American Atheists Legal Center (AALC) decided to harass the small town of Oil City, Pennsylvania by demanding they remove a bench from a veterans’ memorial because it contained a quote from William Penn (the founder of Pennsylvania) which read, “Men who aren’t governed by God will be governed by tyrants.” Using an extremist interpretation of the First Amendment to justify their demands, the AALC claims that this quote is exclusively Christian in nature and thereby constitutes government enforcement of a particular religion on the whole of the population. (http://lc.org/121416LtrfromAmAtheiststoOilCity.pdf) While Atheists groups do vaguely oppose all religious groups, Christianity in particular seems to draw particular ire from organized Atheist groups.

 

American Atheists, a group that has been active since 1963, has an ongoing campaign to combat the distribution of Bibles and Christian literature in public schools. They claim that the purpose of their organization is to promote the civil liberties of Atheists, but their actions are directed as curtailing the civil liberties of Christians. While they currently lack the legal power to outright ban the distribution of Bibles, they intend to “fight back” against such distributions. This is not a “live and let live” mentality, but an antagonistic and hostile stance that one takes against an enemy. Their current method of antagonizing Christians is to have their members report when a Bible distribution occurs so that they may counter with an Atheist literature distribution in direct response. (https://www.atheists.org/activism/school-literature-request)

 

This hateful and antagonistic attitude can be further observed in the tone of their literature. From covers of American Atheist Magazine that mock Christian symbols to the self-proclaimed Atheist manifest entitled “Fighting God” it is clear to see that the mentality behind the organized Atheist movement is not an attempt to build their own ideology as a standalone belief system, but rather as one in direct opposition to theists, particularly Christians.

 

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It is one thing to create or champion an ideology that can stand on its own merits, and quite another to build one whose sole purpose is direct opposition to others. Do American Atheist organizations serve any other purpose rather than to scrub historic references to Christianity from monuments, cancel or change the titles of company and university Christmas parties, and create a stir when Christians attempt to distribute free Bibles?

 

Americans live in a society that holds individual liberty as a sacred right. While we can certainly be criticized for flaws in this regard, we continually strive for greater freedom with every passing generation. While the vast majority of Americans support the right of Atheists or any other group to live by whatever standard they hold, and even the right to band together to defend and preserve their rights to self-determination, virtually no one supports their right to dictate to others how they must live. The non-establishment clause has been commandeered by Atheists as a tool of oppression in order to force a secularist society on a largely religious population. It is time for that to end. Atheists are free to live as they choose, and so are the rest of us.